The Complete Guide to the Health Benefits of Pineapple Juice

Fruit and vegetable juices are unlike any other. Regarding drinks that offer completely natural health benefits, few remedies rival freshly squeezed juice from fruits and vegetables. Apple, orange, carrot, or tomato juice — you name it. Any and all of these natural and unprocessed juices contain many nutrients and health benefits, and it can be hard to keep track. 


Out of all of these fruit and vegetable juices, one stands out the most: pineapple juice. 


Taste is a personal preference. Everyone likes different things, especially when it comes to food and drinks. So, if you don’t like pineapple, you might not be partial to pineapple juice. 


That’s okay. Once you read through all of the benefits pineapple juice offers, you might be inclined to give it another try. If you still aren’t convinced or just can’t get over the taste, that’s still okay! We’ve also included a list of alternatives or other methods in which you can still reap similar benefits of pineapple juice. 


If you are a fan of pineapple, we are too, which is why we’ve created this guide. It’s always important to know what you’re putting into your body, especially if it’s something you consume often. Luckily, there are very few, if any, disadvantages of eating pineapple. 


Below, you’ll find a complete guide of facts about pineapple juice and how it can help you further your health journey. 


Two Important Things To Know About Pineapple Juice

Before we get into the actual list of benefits, we must cover what is in pineapple juice, from the beneficial properties to the stuff you should look out for.


Its Sugar Content

Surprisingly, there is a downside to drinking pineapple juice. There’s a reason why there are few fruits that rival the sweet taste of pineapple juice: sugar and added sugar or calories if your juice comes from a bottle or can. Disappointingly, pineapple juice has some of the highest natural sugar content out of all juices. 


However, this shouldn’t scare you away. The health benefits of pineapple juice are sky-high. In other words, the pros generally outweigh the cons. Consider this a small warning, as one cup of pineapple juice contains roughly 25 grams of sugar. 


Overindulging in sugar, natural or unnatural, can eventually lead to weight gain. Remember, pineapple juice only becomes unhealthy if you have way too much, such as consistently consuming more than one cup a day. One cup of pineapple juice per day or a few times a week is highly encouraged, so you can reap the benefits from the multitude of vitamins and nutrients pineapple juice contains. 


Its Nutritional Value

Pineapple juice is low in fiber and protein compared to other fruit and vegetable juices. One cup of pineapple juice contains 0.5 and 0.9 grams of fiber and protein, respectively. So, if you’re looking to up your intake in either of those categories, it might be wise to look elsewhere. 


Luckily, fiber and protein aren’t hard to come by. However, if you want to increase your vitamin intake, you are definitely in the right place. 


One cup of pineapple juice contains 110 mg (milligram) of vitamin C and 0.25 mg of vitamin B6. It also boasts significant levels of folate, thiamin, and vitamin A. 


Additionally, one cup of fresh pineapple juice is high in calcium, magnesium, manganese, and potassium. 


Pineapple juice is chock full of antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals essential in aiding your immune system and helping energy production. 


The Secret Weapon of Pineapple Juice: Bromelain

Through all of the nutritional benefits of pineapples, there is one big thing we left out on purpose: bromelain. Bromelain isn’t well known, but it is crucial in giving pineapple juice all of the health benefits we’re about to cover. 


Bromelain is an enzyme found exclusively in pineapple, and it is what makes the health properties of pineapple juice so unique. Although it was unknown for a long time, bromelain has been used for centuries by ancient cultures as a healing and digestive health remedy. 


Bromelain can offer a wide variety of potential benefits, and we are here to elaborate on some of the most impressive.


Heart Health

Consumption of pineapple juice (and specifically bromelain) can help prevent heart disease, including heart attacks, strokes, high blood pressure, heart failure, and more. 


This prevention is especially helpful for those with diabetes. Around 65% of deaths of people with diabetes are attributed to cardiovascular diseases such as heart attack or stroke. 


If you don’t have diabetes, this does not mean you are exempt from these diseases, so a high bromelain intake and proper nutrition can be beneficial. 


Immune System

Pineapple juice has also been shown to boost our immune systems through bromelain. While studies are still in their infancy, there have been promising results that bromelain triggers our immune system and has additional properties that add protection against illnesses from a simple cold to the flu. 


In addition to the boost bromelain provides when you drink pineapple juice, it can also help with recovery from symptoms of illnesses and infections, like bacterial infections. 


Inflammation and Digestion

The enzymes in pineapple juice are an excellent way to reduce swelling and aid stomach problems like nausea, diarrhea, or indigestion. 


Specifically, if you have a condition that makes digestion difficult, bromelain can help counteract some side effects.


Other Information To Keep in Mind

It is important to remember that while there is a lot of research about bromelain, there is still much work to be done. These studies merely suggest that these benefits are attributed to bromelain. Still, we know that pineapple juice contains benefits that are crucial in developing a healthy routine and diet. 


Keep in mind that pineapple juice contains a lot of sugar. Don’t rush to the store and begin drinking cup after cup. 


One cup of pineapple juice per day is encouraged and recommended. Anything more might end up hurting your health routine — if not because of the sugar content, then because pineapple is highly acidic and can, over time, cause harm to your teeth, gums, and the rest of your upper digestive tract if consumed excessively.


What If I Don’t Like Pineapple?

We get it. Sometimes, no matter how healthy a food or drink is, you just can’t force yourself to like something. We have two simple ideas that might help you get over your dislike towards pineapple. 


  • Smoothies: Smoothies are quick and easy to make. You can either include some chopped-up pineapple chunks in your blender or add a can of unsweetened pineapple juice. Either way, you’ll be getting all of the vitamins and nutrients you need from pineapple, and you can get the added benefits of other fruits and vegetables. 


  • Mixed Juice: If you have a juice shop nearby or have a juicer at home, you can easily include pineapple juice in any drink you can think of. Common combinations include pineapple, apple, cucumber, ginger, watermelon, and pineapple, but the options are endless. We highly recommend adding some pineapple juice for a quick and easy health boost to whatever your go-to combination is. 


How Can Able Help?

You know about the health benefits of fruits, vegetables, and juices. You know that you have the ability to turn your diet and lifestyle around into something healthier and happier. These big changes can be overwhelming, but Able is here to help you through it all. 


Able is a health application that can help you achieve your health goals, no matter how big or how little. Some added help is never a bad idea when you begin your health journey. With Able, you can get that and more. 


Able makes new health routines easier, from movement and diet suggestions to an accurate estimate of when you will meet your goal. Start feeling like yourself again with a new and improved health routine and lifestyle. 


No matter how difficult it might seem, Able makes everything that much easier. Your health should always be your priority, and Able is here every step of the way. 




Sources: 

Pineapple juice, canned or bottled, unsweetened, with added ascorbic acid | U.S. Department of Food and Agriculture  

Bromelain | National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health

Properties and Therapeutic Application of Bromelain: A Review | U.S. National Library of Medicine